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Study in netherlands

INTRODUCTION

Live and Study with Nature!!!

The Netherlands is part of mainland Europe, it sits in Western Europe with an extensive coastline to the North Sea and shares land borders with Germany and Belgium. The Netherlands is also known as Holland and was the first non-native English speaking country to offer courses taught in English to international students. Now almost all courses offered to international students are taught in English and Dutch, which is great if you’re planning on studying in the Netherlands.

Study in Netherlands is similar to other popular study abroad destinations in terms of duration:

  • Bachelors Degree (BA, BSc, BEng): 3-4 Years
  • Masters Degree (MA, MSc, MEng): 1-2 Years
  • PhD: 4 Years

The higher education system in the Netherlands is made up primarily of three different types of institution, each with a unique offering to an international student. These are Research Universities, Universities of Applied Science and Institutes for International Education.

 

 
Study in Netherlands 1
Study in Netherlands 1

INTRODUCTION

Live and Study with Nature!!!

The Netherlands is part of mainland Europe, it sits in Western Europe with an extensive coastline to the North Sea and shares land borders with Germany and Belgium. The Netherlands is also known as Holland and was the first non-native English speaking country to offer courses taught in English to international students. Now almost all courses offered to international students are taught in English and Dutch, which is great if you’re planning on studying in the Netherlands.

Study in Netherlands is similar to other popular study abroad destinations in terms of duration:

  • Bachelors Degree (BA, BSc, BEng): 3-4 Years
  • Masters Degree (MA, MSc, MEng): 1-2 Years
  • PhD: 4 Years

The higher education system in the Netherlands is made up primarily of three different types of institution, each with a unique offering to an international student. These are Research Universities, Universities of Applied Science and Institutes for International Education.

 

 

Certain degrees levels are only available from each institution type.

  • Bachelors: Available at Research Universities and Universities of Applied Sciences
  • Masters: Available at all Institution types
  • PhDs: Available only at Research Universities

The Netherlands is an established and revered seat of higher education with 4 universities in the QS Top 100 Universities 2010/11, those institutions are University of Amsterdam, Leiden University, Utrecht University and Erasmus University Rotterdam. 
Use the course search above to find the right course for you.

The Netherlands is part of mainland Europe, it sits in Western Europe with an extensive coastline to the North Sea and shares land borders with Germany and Belgium. The Netherlands is also known as Holland and was the first non-native English speaking country to offer courses taught in English to international students. Now almost all courses offered to international students are taught in English and Dutch, which is great if you’re planning on studying in the Netherlands.

Study in Netherlands is similar to other popular study abroad destinations in terms of duration:

  • Bachelors Degree (BA, BSc, BEng): 3-4 Years
  • Masters Degree (MA, MSc, MEng): 1-2 Years
  • PhD: 4 Years

The higher education system in the Netherlands is made up primarily of three different types of institution, each with a unique offering to an international student. These are Research Universities, Universities of Applied Science and Institutes for International Education.

Certain degrees levels are only available from each institution type.

  • Bachelors: Available at Research Universities and Universities of Applied Sciences
  • Masters: Available at all Institution types
  • PhDs: Available only at Research Universities

The Netherlands is an established and revered seat of higher education with 4 universities in the QS Top 100 Universities 2010/11, those institutions are University of Amsterdam, Leiden University, Utrecht University and Erasmus University Rotterdam. Use the course search above to find the right course for you.

Study in Netherlands

Higher education in the Netherlands is subsidised by the government and helps to keep tuition costs below that of the main study abroad destinations – USA, Australia and the UK. The qualifications will boost you career prospects as well as show you as an ‘out-of-the-box’ thinker for choosing a less well-known destination.

The Dutch are a welcoming nation of open minded and tolerant people and you will find a very diverse culture in most cities and their Universities. There is a lot to do and see in the country, some of which is described in the “About the Netherlands” section to the right. The country offers excellent transport links to other European countries which gives you the option of travelling and sight-seeing in other popular destinations such as France and Germany at a low cost during your time there. For more information on Studying in the Netherlands visit the official Nuffic Site.

Study in Netherlands

Higher education in the Netherlands is subsidised by the government and helps to keep tuition costs below that of the main study abroad destinations – USA, Australia and the UK. The qualifications will boost you career prospects as well as show you as an ‘out-of-the-box’ thinker for choosing a less well-known destination.

The Dutch are a welcoming nation of open minded and tolerant people and you will find a very diverse culture in most cities and their Universities. There is a lot to do and see in the country, some of which is described in the “About the Netherlands” section to the right. The country offers excellent transport links to other European countries which gives you the option of travelling and sight-seeing in other popular destinations such as France and Germany at a low cost during your time there. For more information on Studying in the Netherlands visit the official Nuffic Site.

Detailed Information On Education Study in Netherlands

1. An international and multicultural environment

 

Some may ask “Why study in the Netherlands?” But with boat trips on canals and lakes, lazing on beaches, enjoying the view of the woods, a moderate climate and the crossroads where the German, British, French, Chinese and many other cultures meet, others would say “Why not?”

International students from all over the world come to study in the Netherlands. In 2014/15, international students came from a total of 157 different countries, mostly from Germany, China, Belgium, Italy and Spain. Most Dutch universities have international student associations, which help students throughout their studies.

The Netherlands is also a unique non-Anglophone country, where approximately 95% of locals speak English. This factor makes living, studying, and working in the Netherlands very convenient, comfortable and pleasant for international students. The Netherlands is also very open and tolerant, welcoming everyone to share their opinions and express themselves. This is very much encouraged during your studies.

2. Affordable study costs

Studying in the Netherlands is not that expensive, compared with other English-speaking countries such as the UK or US. Dutch higher education is subsidized by the government and tuition fees are relatively low. With the country’s renowned standard of education and comparatively low cost of living, studying in the Netherlands will give you true value for money. Annual tuition fees for a degree program or course at a Dutch higher education institution start at approximately €1,900 for EU students and €6,000 for non-EU students, depending on the institution.

Further, if you decide to have a job alongside your studies, you can also declare these expenses, and get some money back from taxes. How cool is that? In addition, many Dutch universities offer grants and scholarships that can reduce or fully cover the tuition fees of study programs.

3. Innovative teaching methods

The Dutch educational system is of high quality and Dutch universities are acknowledged worldwide for their well-designed, modern courses and facilities. The teaching style focuses on teamwork, which makes it easy for international students in the Netherlands to meet Dutch people as well as other international students.

Dutch universities place a strong emphasis on good personal relations between professors and students. Most tutorials and seminars take place in small groups of around 15-30 students. Most of your coursework will consist of group work, developing not only your academic skills but also your ability to work together as part of a team. Dutch universities include many practical elements in their degree courses. There is a high emphasis on relevant practical experiences, and universities have a lot of partnerships with Dutch companies, as well as international ones.

As well as general universities, there are also universities of applied sciences, which provide more specialized studies. For those who prefer to gain insights into practical issues, a university of applied sciences might be more attractive. These focus more on practical experiences and less on theoretical and research matters.

4. Affordable living expenses

Compared with other western European locations, the cost of living in the Netherlands is relatively low. From my own experience and from my friends’, you will need between €800 and €1,000 per month. To fund this, you can combine part-time jobs and study finance. If you are a EU student, you can work 32 hours a month and be eligible for a €265 grant and a student OV-Chipkaart for free public transportation either during the week or weekends.

There are many useful websites for students to find student accommodation. I would advise you to start looking for accommodation early, because there is a huge demand. From my experience, if starting studies in September, the best months to start looking for accommodation are May, June and July. Definitely don’t wait until August, as you will end up either finding expensive or low quality rooms.

As a student, you can also get discounts in many bars, restaurants, museums and cinemas. You can get around town easily on a bicycle. This is not only typically Dutch, but also a cheap means of transportation. You should definitely ask for an ISIC Student Card to get many more benefits and discounts.

5. A wide range of degrees taught in English

The Netherlands is known as the first non-English speaking country in which universities started to design higher education study programs in English, to attract students coming from abroad. More than 2,100 English-taught study programs and courses are available in the Netherlands, covering a broad range of fields, and leading to a bachelor’s, master’s, PhD, diploma or certificate.

It certainly does sound great: high-quality, affordable education offered in many disciplines, in an international, open-minded country. However, Dutch universities do have strict language requirements if you come from a country where English is not the native language. As an international student you are required to take the TOEFL, IELTS or a similar English language test. You should check the university where you are planning to apply, for more details about their requirements.

As I mentioned, the Netherlands is a very international country and very convenient as most people speak English. Nevertheless, I think it’s always valuable to take an introductory Dutch language course to at least pick up the basics, and many universities in the Netherlands offer Dutch languages courses for internationals. You can also use other online resources to find language courses, as well as new cool language apps and dictionaries to ease your stay in the Netherlands.

6. Excellent opportunities for travel

The Netherlands is centrally located in Europe and is in easy reach of all major European cities. The Netherlands is often described as the “gateway to Europe”. It takes only about an hour to fly from Amsterdam to Paris, Berlin, Brussels, or London. It also has great connections and accessibility by train to all major European cities.

The Netherlands also has a well-developed and connected transportation system, and various discounts for students make travelling quite affordable. As mentioned, when working 32 hours a month, you can also get a student OV-Chipkaart, which gives you access to free public transportation. This makes it very convenient and cheap to explore the whole country. Further, you will love how easy it is to get around with a bike – the preferred means of transportation of the Dutch, and also the cheapest. You can cycle in peace, confidence and tranquility, as there are dedicated roads for cyclists.

7. Internationally recognized degrees

The Netherlands has also been recognized as a knowledge center with rich study traditions and well-known universities. Scientific research at Dutch universities is very highly valued at both the national and international level. Education in the Netherlands meets all international standards and is well-reputed worldwide. A diploma from a Dutch university provides an opportunity to start one’s own business and can be very useful in terms of having a successful career in any country of the world.

The most recognized universities in the Netherlands include the University of Amsterdam, Leiden University and Utrecht University.

The Netherlands Higher Education System

Structure of the Higher Educational System in The Netherlands Admissions to Higher Education in The Netherlands Types of Higher Education Institutions in The Netherlands Cycles of Higher Education in The Netherlands

Types of Higher Education Institutions

Higher education in the Netherlands is provided by three types of institution.

Government-funded institutions receive funding from the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science or the Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation, and charge their students government-approved fees. There are 36 higher professional education institutions and 14 universities, including the Open University.

Legal entities providing higher education’ are covered by the terms of the Higher Education and Research Act but are not funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science. They are free to decide on their own fees and admissions policy, although students must be in possession of a HAVO, MBO or VWO certificate. Students at these institutions are eligible for student support. Like government-funded institutions, legal entities providing higher education award bachelor’s and/or master’s degrees for courses that are accredited. A small number of these institutions (primarily for faith-based higher education) do receive funding. Many of the provisions of the Higher Education and Research Act do not apply to legal entities providing higher education.

Private-sector institutions are not covered by the Higher Education and Research Act. They include foreign universities and business schools to which Dutch government regulations do not apply.

Higher professional education

Higher professional education is provided at ‘hogescholen’ (institutions of higher professional education) and is for students aged around 17 and over. HBO institutions generally offer courses in several different fields.

The average size of HBO institutions is constantly increasing as a result not only of mergers but also of rising student numbers. There are 36 government-funded higher professional education institutions. In addition, there are about 60 legal entities providing higher professional education.

In addition to the range of initial courses of higher professional education, there are also a small number of advanced courses, most of which have been upgraded to master’s degree courses. These include art courses, courses in architecture, and teacher training courses in special education or leading to a grade 1 qualification in general subjects. These are open to students who have already completed a higher education programme.

University education

Degree courses are provided at 14 universities, including the Open University. Three universities – the universities of technology in Delft (TUD), Eindhoven (TUE) and Twente (UT) – focus predominantly on engineering and technology. Besides the 14 universities, there are a number of approved institutions, including six offering theological courses, one offering a degree course in humanism, and Nyenrode Business University.

  • First Cycle Programmes
  • Bachelor Types of programmes

Higher professional education

HBO institutions provide theoretical and practical training for occupations for which a higher vocational qualification is either required or useful. Graduates find employment in various fields, including middle and high-ranking jobs in trade and industry, social services, health care and the public sector. In higher professional education, research tends to be application-related. They have the following tasks:

  • to provide initial bachelor’s degree programmes;
  • to provide master’s degree programmes under certain conditions;
  • to transfer knowledge for the benefit of the community;
  • to contribute to the development of those occupations to which their teaching is geared;
  • to devote attention to students’ personal development and foster their sense of social responsibility;
  • within the framework of their responsibilities in the field of education, to train Dutch students to improve their communicative proficiency in Dutch.

University education

Universities combine academic research and teaching. University education focuses on training in academic disciplines, the independent pursuit of scholarship and the application of scholarly knowledge in the context of a profession and aims to improve understanding of the phenomena studied in the various disciplines and generate new knowledge.

Universities have the following tasks:

  • to provide initial courses in higher education (i.e. bachelor’s and master’s degree programmes);
  • to carry out research;
  • to train researchers and design engineers;
  • to transfer knowledge for the benefit of the community;
  • to devote attention to student’s personal development and foster their sense of social responsibility;
  • within the framework of their responsibilities in the field of education, to train Dutch students to improve their communicative proficiency in Dutch.

University education includes both the study of academic disciplines and specialised training for certain occupations.

A bachelor’s programme primarily trains students in academic disciplines. They acquire skills and specialised knowledge, as well as analytical ability. University education does not end with the completion of the three-year bachelor’s phase, however. Graduates may opt to get a job after obtaining their bachelor’s degree and then follow a master’s degree course later on, if they wish. Alternatively, they may proceed directly to a master’s programme. It is only then that they start to specialise. The master’s degree lays the foundation for an academic career, although many students go straight on to the labour market after completing their master’s degree.

Tuition fees and living expenses in the Netherlands

Dutch universities charge tuition fees for higher education programmes. Depending on their country of origin, students will pay somewhere between € 2,000 and € 20,000 for one study year. They can also expect to spend € 10,350 on accommodation, food and health insurance. To reduce expenses when studying in the Netherlands, students can apply for a scholarship or find a part-time job. Tuition fees for Bachelor’s and Master’s programmes in 2017-2018 Government-funded Dutch universities have two types of tuition fees, statutory and institutional. Statutory fees are a fixed amount set by the Dutch government for all universities. Most students from the Netherlands and other EU/EEA countries must pay this type of fee for Bachelor’s and Master’s programmes. For 2017-2018, the statutory fee is set at € 2,006 per year. Institutional fees are set by the university itself and are applicable to students from outside of the EU/EEA. The amount depends on specialisations and other conditions. On average, the institutional fee for 2017-2018 is between € 6,000 and € 20,000 per year. Private university tuition fees are comparable to government-funded university fees. Preparatory courses are usually the same amount for both EU and non-EU students. Please note that tuition fees usually don’t include the cost of study books, uniforms, internships, or other additional expenses. Depending on the programme, these extra fees range from € 500 to € 2,000 per year. See a detailed breakdown of tuition fees at Dutch universities in the Eurogates database.
  • Bachelor’s programmes
  • Master’s programmes

Living expenses in the Netherlands

According to the Dutch Immigration and Naturalisation Service (IND), student needs € 10,412 per year (€ 867.68 per month) to cover living expenses including accommodation, food, health insurance, and transport costs in the Netherlands. International students who require a visa must have this amount in their bank account in order to start the Entry and Residence Procedure (TEV).This sum does not cover spending money for trips around Europe, going out to eat at restaurants, or other social activities (movies, drinks, museums, etc.).

Financial requirements

To receive a student visa, candidates must prove they have sufficient finances to live in the Netherlands for at least one year (€ 10,412). In most cases, they must transfer this sum to the university’s bank account prior to completing their visa application. Students will get access to these finances when they arrive in the country. Students must also pay the tuition fee for the first study year before it begins. Deadlines for making the payment depend on the university. Some institutions allow payment to be made several weeks before courses begin while others require the payment to be made before applying for the student visa. Details regarding the tuition fee payment, including deadlines, can be found on each university’s website.

Reducing expenses

High-quality higher education is expensive. However, studying in the Netherlands is quite affordable compared to other countries like the UK or US. For example, tuition fees start at € 15,000 in the UK, three times more expensive than in the Netherlands. Living costs in the UK are also higher. Student needs to have at least € 1,380 per month to apply for a visa (versus € 867.68 in the Netherlands).

List of Universities

  • Universiteit van Amsterdam
  • TechnischeUniversiteit Delft
  • Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
  • Universiteit Utrecht
  • UniversiteitTwente
  • TechnischeUniversiteit Eindhoven
  • WageningenUniversiteit
  • VrijeUniversiteit Amsterdam
  • Universiteit Leiden
  • RadboudUniversiteit Nijmegen
  • Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam
  • Universiteit van Tilburg
  • Universiteit Maastricht
  • Hogeschool van Amsterdam
  • FontysHogescholen
  • Hogeschool van Arnhem en Nijmegen
  • Hogeschool Utrecht
  • Hanzehogeschool Groningen
  • SaxionHogescholen
  • Hogeschoolvoor de Kunsten Utrecht
  • AVANS Hogeschool
  • HogeschoolINHolland
  • Hogeschool Rotterdam
  • ChristelijkeHogeschoolWindesheim
  • NHTV internationaalhogeronderwijs Breda
  • ArtEZHogeschoolvoor de kunsten
  • Design Academy Eindhoven
  • HogeschoolZuyd
  • UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education
  • AmsterdamseHogeschoolvoor de Kunsten
  • NHL Hogeschool
  • Nyenrode Business Universiteit
  • KoninklijkeAcademie van BeeldendeKunsten Den Haag
  • Stendenhogeschool
  • Hogeschool Leiden
  • De HaagseHogeschool
  • HZ University of Applied Sciences
  • Hogeschool Van Hall Larenstein
  • ChristelijkeHogeschool Ede
  • TIAS School for Business and Society
  • UniversiteitvoorHumanistiek
  • Hotelschool Den Haag
  • Codarts Rotterdam
  • HAS Hogeschool
  • DriestarHogeschool
  • GerritRietveldAcademie
  • IselingeHogeschool
  • HogeschoolViaa
  • Hogeschool de Kempel
  • HogeschoolWittenborg
  • Hogeschool IPABO
  • IslamitischeUniversiteit Rotterdam
  • MarnixAcademie
  • Katholieke PABO Zwolle
  • AeresHogeschool

Student visas and work permits

Students planning to study in the Netherlands need a visa in most cases.

Short stay visa

For a stay of less than three months, a visa may be required, depending on your nationality. You can find information and advice on what is required of you on nuffic.nl, or by contacting your local Dutch consulate or embassy.

Long stay visa

For a stay exceeding three months, you need a provisional residence permit, (“Machtiging tot VoorlopigVerblijf”, abbreviated as “MVV”), unless you are a citizen of an EU/EEA member country, Australia, Canada, Japan, Monaco, New Zealand, the US and Switzerland. This requirement applies to citizens of all other countries. The MVV allows you to enter the Netherlands; however, you must apply for a Residence Permit on arrival.

You will be granted a provisional residence permit under following circumstances:

  • You have a valid passport
  • You have sufficient financial means
  • You are not a danger to public order or national security in the Netherlands
  • The required fees are paid
  • You have a letter or other document from the Dutch host institution stating that you are or will be enrolled as a student or that you are going to do and internship
  • For interns: you have a copy of the application for a work permit if applicable
  • For Chinese students: you have a Nuffic certificate, necessary to follow study programmes which are taught in English

The application process for an MVV could take between three to six months, so it is important to start the process in good time. You can find more information on nuffic.nl or by contacting your local Dutch consulate or embassy.

Residence permit

You are obliged to obtain a residence permit to study in the Netherlands if you are a citizen of a non-EU/EAA country or Switzerland and are planning to stay in the Netherlands for more than three months. It is very important to arrive to the Netherlands with the correct visa; if you arrive on a short stay visa you won’t be able to apply for a resident permit. The residence permit has to be applied for within five days on arriving to the Netherlands.

Upon successful completion of your program of higher education in the Netherlands, you may apply for a residence permit valid for five years. To do this, you must have a contract of employment.

Working while studying in the Netherlands

Many students choose to work while pursuing their education in the Netherlands. Depending on their nationality, students may work for a limited amount of hours/week with a work permit from their employer.

EU/EEA/Swiss nationals are allowed to work in the Netherlands as many hours as they choose while studying. The employer does not need to provide a work permit for this. Foreign students (non EU/EEA/Swiss) with a valid residence permit are allowed to work either full-time seasonal work in June, July and August, or part-time work of no more than ten hours a week outside the summer period. The employer does need to provide a work permit, but it is an easy process, since the employer does not need to prove that there are no Dutch or EU/EAA/Swiss nationals capable of doing the job.

Bulgarian and Roman nationals are also allowed to work while studying in the Netherlands for as many hours as they like while studying. However, the employer does need to provide them with a work permit and also need to show that there are no EU/EEA/Swiss nationals capable of doing the job. Since this is a very difficult process, nationals from Bulgaria and Rumania are advised to work no more than the allowed ten hours/week outside the summer period or fulltime during the summer months of June, July and August. In doing this, the work permit is a lot easier to obtain.

Advantages of Studying in Netherlands

Study in Netherlands 3

1. Outstanding education and research

Through a national system of regulation and quality assurance, The Netherlands offers excellent education that is recognized worldwide, and Dutch international scientific research is placed at the very top ranks. Furthermore, there are about 1,300 international study programmes and courses that are taught entirely in English, allowing international students to feel right at home.  Most of the programmes may also include real work placement, team projects, guest lectures and cases from the work field.

Study in Netherlands 3

1. Outstanding education and research

Through a national system of regulation and quality assurance, The Netherlands offers excellent education that is recognized worldwide, and Dutch international scientific research is placed at the very top ranks. Furthermore, there are about 1,300 international study programmes and courses that are taught entirely in English, allowing international students to feel right at home.  Most of the programmes may also include real work placement, team projects, guest lectures and cases from the work field.

2. The gateway to Europe

Nested between France, England and Germany, the Netherlands is a multicultural society at the heart of Europe. Many European capitals are within easy each: Paris, Madrid or Berlin is just a short flight away from Amsterdam, and Brussels is just two hours by train! As a result, the Dutch universities are most ideal for those who enjoy travelling and soaking up different cultures while studying abroad.  Moreover, nearly every household can receive TV programming from neighbouring countries, what a bonus!

3. More affordable study costs

As compared to other European countries, the Netherlands is a popular choice for students with a tighter budget as it offers lower tuition fees and moderate living expenses.  It is also relatively easier to obtain an entry visa.

4. Internationalism at its best

Embracing the modern and the traditional, the Netherlands is open to people from various cultural backgrounds, countries and continents. Other than Dutch, German and French, about 87% of the population in the Netherlands speaks English, making it easy for international students to communicate and express themselves. The Netherlands is also the first non-English speaking country to teach in English. With over 100 nationalities, studying and teaching in this country, the Netherlands is connected to the world while still preserving its own unique history and culture.

5. Did you know?

The higher education system in the Netherlands consists of two types:

  • Universities (universiteiten) – More on research and teaching from an academic point of view.
  • Universities of Professional Education (hogescholen) – Aims to prepare students more directly for the workplace.

Home to 19,100 kilometers of bicycle paths and lanes, the Netherlands is the perfect paradise for those who enjoy cycling within the embrace of nature and historical buildings. According to the Netherlands Tourist Board, the country’s 16 million people own approximately 13 million bicycles so expect to see more bikes than buses and trains!